Dance the way to express our feelings, emotions. As everybody knows music and dancing, from the ancient years, is the human way to express love, aggressive, freedom to other people or to the God that every culture has . . .

Dance the way to express our feelings, emotions. As everybody knows music and dancing, from the ancient years, is the human way to express love, aggressive, freedom to other people or to the God that every culture has. It all starts when we start feel the music and let it move our body. Such a dance is tango in Argentina it started from immigrants from Europe, Africa, and ports unknown streamed into the outskirts of Buenos Aires during the 1880’s. Many gravitated toward the port city’s houses of ill repute. In these establishments, the portenos (as they were called) could drown their troubles in a few drinks and find some companionship. They looked desperately for a distraction to ease their sense of rootlessness and disfranchisement as “strangers in a strange land.”
From this heady, intermingled cultural brew emerged a new music which became the tango. Though musical historians argue as to its exact origins, it is generally accepted that the tango borrowed from many nations--the relentless rhythms that the African slaves--the candombe--beat on their drums (known as tan-go); the popular music of the pampas (flatlands) known as the milonga, which combined Indian rhythms with the music of early Spanish colonists; and other influences, including Latin. Some say the word “tango” comes from the Latin word tangere (to touch).
As we see all this people tried to escape from their poor life, the social system and develop a music and dance that will express fatality, of destinies engulfed in pain. It is the dance of sorrow. These tango songs and dances had no lyrics, were often highly improvised, and were generally regarded as obscene. Further, the early tangos not only represented a kind of sexual choreography, but often a duel, a man-to-man combat between challengers for the favors of a woman, that usually ended in the symbolic death of an opponent. Sexual and evil forces were equally celebrated in this ritual.

With the advent of the universal suffrage law--passed in Argentina in 1912--the lower classes were allowed to vote, which served to legitimize many of its cultural mainstays, including the tango. As it became absorbed into the larger society, the tango lost some of it abrasiveness. The structure of the dance, however, remained intact, and soon the tango developed into a worldwide phenomenon. Even the Americans were doing it, although some ladies were given to wearing “bumpers” to protect themselves from rubbing a bit too closely against their male partners.
In our days we see that tango has became a dance of high society with women in sleek glittering evening gowns and men in tux and tails. It might have loose the origin but still has the charm of the people that start to dance and create this dance