Loch Ness 'Nessie'

Loch Ness is one of the biggest self-contained lochs in Scotland, and is one of many which make up the route of the Caladonean canal, which provides a boating route all the way from Firth of Lorn near Oban on the west coast up to the Moray Firth on the north coast . . .

The Famous Loch Ness is real or a myth.

Loch Ness is one of the biggest self-contained lochs in Scotland, and is one of many which make up the route of the Caladonean canal, which provides a boating route all the way from Firth of Lorn near Oban on the west coast up to the Moray Firth on the north coast.
The world famous Loch Ness monster, known affectionately as ‘Nessie’ by most people and by the scientific believers as Nessiteras rhombopteryx goes back a long, long way, the first recorded sighting being by no less a person than a holy saint. The saint was St. Columba and the year 565 AD.
The story referred to is dated around 1520, but the letter to the newspaper in 1933 started a spate of references to ‘leviathans in the loch’ and a host of sightings of the fabled monster. This was encouraged by the new road - now the A82 - that was being blasted along the north side of Loch Ness and afforded an unimpaired view of the whole of the loch. It was also in 1933, a time of depression and general misery that Mr. and Mrs. Mackay, owners of the Drumnadrochit hotel were travelling along the new road. According to their account they saw in the centre of the loch “an enormous animal rolling and plunging.” Cynics may say that being the owners of the Drumnadrochit hotel, this couple may well have wanted to see a monster but apparently they did not tell this story widely, although they did tell it to a young water bailiff in Fort Augustus who happened to be a correspondent for the ‘Inverness Courier’ newspaper.
The next time that any reference to the monster surfaced, was in a letter to ‘The Scotsman’ newspaper in 1933 from a Mr. D Murray Rose. He tells of a story in an old book that spoke of the slaying of dragons and: “It goes on to say that Fraser (of Glenvackie) killed the last known dragon in Scotland, but no-one has yet managed to slay the monster of Loch Ness lately seen.”
Many expeditions has searched for the ?monster? with sonar surveys of the loch using the latest equipment have failed to find any conclusive evidence of Nessie’s existence, but neither have they proved that she doesn’t exist. Some accounts may well have been sighted through the bottom of a whisky glass, but there are still a remarkable number of eye witness accounts that ring true.

Some interest informations:

The word ‘loch’ is Gaelic for the English ‘lake’.
The number of tourists and travellers visiting Loch Ness has increased in relation to international interest in the monster
Loch Ness is one of 24 monster sites in Scotland.

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Also, the ‘monster in the loch’ phenomena seems to be spreading. A lake as far away as Japan now claims it has its own monster and the latest to join the ‘monster in a lake’ set is Lake Van, a salt water lake in South Eastern Turkey.